Wednesday, March 19, 2014

The San Antonio Book Festival



This post is for you locals out there... Last year, something amazing happened. San Antonio got its own book festival. And not just a little, puny, insignificant book festival. A real live, highly planned, amazingly entertaining one. Headed up by Katy Flato (the most efficient organizer and one of the most generous people I know) and the San Antonio Public Library Foundation (yup, San Antonio has a private charitable organization that augments our public library system's budget... raising more that 35 million dollars in the past three decades), year two is turning out to be even more fun with more things to do for anyone and everyone who loves the written word. And it's all FREE!

The San Antonio Book Festival takes over our bright red and amazing Central Library, the lovely Southwest School of Art, and the street in-between on Saturday, April 5 for book signings, conversation, lectures, readings, and activities for kids. This all day event features food trucks, live music, and more books and writers than you can possibly fathom (or at least fit into two city blocks). Poetry. Fiction. Nonfiction. It has it all!

Everyone's favorite morning show veteran, Jane Pauley, and National Book Award winner Barry Lopez (one of our authors) are headlining a roster of more than 90 talents who are participating in this incredible display of literary prowess. The lineup is stellar. I'm particularly stoked about Philip Meyer, the author of the epic Texas novel, The Sonwho will be in conversation with Michael Fisher, the VP of Faculty and Student Affairs at Trinity University and head of editorial board where I work. 

This festival is exactly why San Antonio has been getting a good rap as an amazing place to live, because we support the literary arts and come out full force when people create awesome things. The day is being capped off this year by the debut of San Antonio's Literary Death Match, a show described by the Los Angeles Times as the “most entertaining reading series ever.” The smack down takes place at The Charline McCombs Empire Theatre and is the only part of the festival that you actually need a ticket for, available here

If you make it out, (which if you live in San Antonio you should because if you don't you are totally lame, and I mean TOTALLY lame), be sure to stop by and say hi at the Trinity University Press booth, where I'll be shilling our wares and talking about books all day, or until my voice gives out. A special treat for all you vintage book lovers. A trip to Central Library is not complete without a visit to the basement for a shopping spree at the BookCellar, a used book shop that sells record LPs, withdrawn library books, new and used reads, and more. All run by volunteers and open every day, year round. The kids' section is HUGE, and I spent many an hour there back during my stay-at-home mommy years. Ahhhh, memories of all the books I discovered down that hallowed hole. (I bought my first James Flora there!) 

Anyway, be there or be totally square.

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Read along on FacebooktumblrTwitterEtsy and Graphic Novels My Kid Loves.

Crash! Bang! Boom!


Crash Bang Boom
Peter Spier ~ Doubleday and Co., 1972

It's been a great spring break here in Texas. A visit with my sister. The premiere of the incredible Cosmos series. (If you aren't watching this with your kids, they are really missing out.) Beautiful weather... even though every time it seems like spring is here, old mother climate change has other plans. On this bright and beautiful nearly spring day, I just thought I'd peek in and share with you another gem by one of my all time faves, Peter Spier.

Similar in theme to Goggle Growl Grunt!, Crash! Bang! Boom! is a visual extravaganza of sound. BLUBBA-BLUBBA-BLUB... the sound a glass of liquid makes when a child blows into it through a straw. The RAT TAT TAT TAT TAT of a stick taping along a picket fence. The WHOOOOOOOOO of a tornado.

Or more dated sounds like the CRRRUNCH of an ice tray makes. The SCREEEEEETCH chalk makes on a black board. The hacking cough made my Daddy (UGH-UGH-UGH) when he smokes that awful pipe. The fake death by popgun, OH! AH! The FUDDA-FUDDA-FUDDA-FUDDA of a classroom reel-to-reel. It's a time machine of a good time, all illustrated with Spier's delectably detailed drawings. Never gets old...



Also by:
The Fox Went Out On a Chilly Evening
The Star-Spangled Banner
Noah's Ark
Peter Spier's Christmas
Gobble Growl Grunt
Rain
Bored -- Nothing To Do!
Peter Spier's Little Bible Storybooks
Oh, Were They Ever Happy!

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Read along on FacebooktumblrTwitterEtsy and Graphic Novels My Kid Loves.

Saturday, February 22, 2014

Alice's Restaurant

Alice's Restaurant
Arlo Guthrie ~ Marvin Glass ~ Grove Press, 1968

In an effort to visit this spot at least once a week, I want to share with you one of my favorite library finds. This past Thanksgiving, I contemplated whether or not my eight-year-old son was ready to partake in the listening of "Alice's Restaurant Massacree" (commonly called "Alice's Restaurant"), a Streetman family tradition since the beginning of time. I forgot to actually get the old record player cranked up, but regardless, seeing as I found this fabulous semi-nonfiction book in the children's section of the library where I work, the decision has been made. He's definitely ready!

As most of you kids born to the baby boomer generation know "Alice's Restaurant Massacree" is a song/ spoken word extravaganza written by Arlo Guthrie (son of famed folk singer Woody and a hippy-era legend in his own right) that was eventually made into a full length feature film staring Arlo himself. The story told within the song is loosely based on true events that happened to Arlo surrounding a Thanksgiving feast at his friend Alice's church/house in 1965 and involves a rather complicated case of arrest due to littering.



This song is called "Alice's Restaurant." It's about Alice, and the restaurant, but "Alice's Restaurant" is not the name of the restaurant, that's just the name of the song. That's why I call the song "Alice's Restaurant."

For those of you who have never heard the song before, it is freaking HILARIOUS and smartly political. Radio stations used to play the full 19 minute track every Thanksgiving when I was little (do they still do that?), so it was always a tradition in my house to sing along and recite as many of the lines as you could remember. It wasn't until high school that my sisters and I scored our own LP version of it and could listen whenever we wanted. (The B-side of which carries one on my all-time favorite songs ever, "The Motorcycle Song". Look it up. Best three minutes of your life.) 

The basic premise is that Arlo and his buddy go visit Alice for Thanksgiving and arrive at her house (which is an old church) only to find that Alice has a habit of letting the garbage pile up. In a friendly gesture, the two load the "half-a-ton" of garbage into their "red VW microbus with the shovels and rakes and implements of destruction" on top and take it to the dump only to discover that the dump is closed on Thanksgiving.

We'd never heard of a dump closed on Thanksgiving before, and with tears in our eyes, we drove off into the sunset lookin' for another place to put the garbage. We didn't find one 'til we came to a side road, and off the side of the side road was a fifteen-foot cliff, and at the bottom of the cliff was another pile of garbage. And we decided that one big pile was better than two little piles, and rather than bring that one up, we decided to throw ours down.

This unfortunate event leads to an arrest and turns into one of the greatest songs sung by anyone, ever. It is a story about friendship. Kinda. More really about the Vietnam draft. It is anti-war and pro-people. It stars the unforgettable Officer Obie and a cast of other characters that entertain, educate, and delight. 

This song is one of those things in the world that reminds you how awesome people can be.



So let's just say that I was beyond the moon psyched to discover a book version of this ditty existed. I couldn't find anything on the illustrator (unless he is or was related to one of the greatest toy designers OF ALL TIME... Lite Bright, Mouse Trap, Rock'Em Sock'Em Robots and THE INCH WORM? Yes? No? Anyone? Anyone?) Regardless of who he was, the simple black and yellow illustrations are perfect for the tale. Whimsical and completely silly in a way over the top way.

Anywho... the existence of this book is way, way, way super cool in my book. If for some reason you've never heard of "Alice's Restaurant" (and aren't particularly prissy), take a seat on the "group W bench" and listen up and.... you're welcome.



Oh, what the hell...






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Saturday, February 8, 2014

Gia and the One Hundred Dollars Worth of Bubblegum


Frank Asch - McGraw-Hill Companies, 1974

Hello kids. Feels weird and strange to have been away from the interwebs for so long. (Though you can always visit me daily on Instagram if you just ask.) Happy new year and all that. I've been posting some over on my other blog, but mainly I've been working and taking care of family. Just wanted to share a little yellowed paperback that's been getting some love around these parts.





One day Gia and her friends were on their way to the circus...
...when they found an old dog with a hurt paw.
"Go on without me," said Gia. "I'll stay with this poor old dog."
Ever so carefully, Gia took the dog home and bandaged his paw.
"Thanks," said the dog, and gave Gia a hundred dollars.



Can you guess what she does with it?





Also by:
MacGoose's Grocery
Here Comes the Cat!
Monkey Face



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Monday, November 25, 2013

Great Holiday Give Winners!

Sorry I missed Friday guys! Too much going on. Even still... I am here now with the winners of the truncated four days of the Great Holiday Give!

The winner of the day four prize of the New York Review Children's Collection two-fer is Sy Pie.

The winner of the day three prize of The World is Round is Fierce Nauga.

The winner of the day two prize of the Cranberryport books is Mary Making.

The winner of the day one prize of Little Boy Brown is Sasha Dewitt.

To make up for my lack of a give on Friday, I have selected another winner at random from the fours days of entries to win a vintage surprise package from my personal collection. The winner of that secret bit of awesome is... Andrea!

Congrats winners. Please send me your mailing address to webe(at)soon(dot)com, and I will get your prizes out ASAP! Happy Hanukkah and Happy Thanksgiving all!




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Thursday, November 21, 2013

Day Four Great Holiday Give: New York Review Children’s Collection Two-fer


Day four of the Great Holiday Give is here and we have two delightful reprints up for grabs, donated by the incomparable New York Review Children's Collection. Seriously, you could just buy off their list and be done with the holidays. But I digress! So, who didn't love Pat the Bunny as a child? Well, it seems that the author Dorothy Kunhardt did a slew of other books including the two we are going to give away here! Now Open the Box, (later re-illustrated by P.J. Miller and published as Little Peewee) and Junket is Nice, packaged up in the red-spined, signature look that makes NYRCC so classy and glam!

To win your very own brand spanking new copies of these two superfab books, simply comment on this post before midnight CT on Sunday, November 24. A winner for this give (and the other four daily gives) will be selected at random and the winners will be announced Monday the 25th.

Make sure you check back on Monday's post to find out if you're a winner!

Day One Great Holiday Give: Little Boy Brown
Day Two Great Holiday Give: Cranberryport Books
Day Three Great Holiday Give: The World Is Round 

Happy Thursday kids!



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Wednesday, November 20, 2013

Day Three Great Holiday Give: The World is Round


Today's give is the brand new edition of The World is Round by Gertrude Stein, illustrated by Clement Hurd, a book that was first brought to my attention years ago by my favorite blogger, Ariel Winter. In this 75th anniversary edition (that is pretty hefty and swank, BTW), Harper Design includes a foreword by Thacher Hurd (Clement's son) and an afterword by Edith Thacher Hurd (children's book author and Clement's wife). Very nice edition of a fabulous book.

To win your very own brand spanking new copy of this, the only children's book by a literary legend, simply comment on this post before midnight CT on Sunday, November 24. A winner for this give (and the other four daily gives) will be selected at random and the winners will be announced Monday the 25th.

Make sure you check back on Monday's post to find out if you're a winner!

Day One Great Holiday Give: Little Boy Brown
Day Two Great Holiday Give: Cranberryport Books
Day Four Great Holiday Give: New York Review Children's Collection Two-fer

Happy humpday all!



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